16
Dec

Chemicals & Whey In Protein Powders Are Making You SICK

Protein powders are making you sick

If you are exercising, a protein powder supplement can help you to build muscle tone, helping you burn fat quicker and recover better and faster after your workout. For something that some people consider a health supplement, you need to be aware that not all protein supplements are made the same. Unknowingly, these hidden chemicals and whey isolates are making you sick!

So what makes you choose one over the other? Price tag, marketing or peer recommendations? You must take control and become familiar with these Top 4 toxic and allergic ingredients found in popular protein powders, making sure they are not hiding inside YOUR protein of choice.

Make sure any supplements you take DO NOT contain the following common but toxic ingredients:

1. Soy Protein Isolate

 
Contains anti-nutrients which are damaging to your health, phytoestrogens that can disrupt the hormone balances in your body and cause enlargement or depression of the thyroid gland. It is processed by an ‘acid-washing’ method, leaching aluminium into the product which has been found to cause certain cancers and Alzheimer’s disease.

2. Whey Protein Isolate, Whey Protein Concentrate, Whey Protein Hydrolysate, Sodium Caseinate

 
All of these come from dairy, one of the most highly allergic foods in the world. Whey is the by-product of cheese production, so the waste product left after the milk has been curdled and strained. It used to be tossed away as a waste material. It is much more likely to cause stomach upset, bloating, allergic reactions and digestive problems and is much less of a whole food source of protein than pea protein. Sodium Caseinate has very similar structures to gluten so people with gluten sensitivities are very likely to have casein allergies without knowing.

3. Sucralose

 
A chlorinated artificial sweetener which can reduce the amount of good bacteria in your gut by up to 50%. Sucralose has been known to contribute to weight gain, migraines, blurred vision, dizziness, gastrointestinal problems, allergic reactions and increases in blood sugar. It is said to actually bear more of a chemical similarity to DDT (a toxic farming pesticide) than to sugar!

4. Acesulfame Potassium (Acesulfame K)

 
Processed using methylene chloride which is a paint stripper and known carcinogen (a substance proven to cause cancer). The FDA warns about possible contamination.

Also check for: High amounts of caffeine and stimulants, artificial colours, flavours and preservatives (numbers and letters) and sugar.

ALWAYS CHECK THE INGREDIENT LABELS ON YOUR SUPPLEMENT PRODUCTS TO SEE WHAT REALLY IS IN THEM. JUST BECAUSE SOMEONE SAYS IT IS HEALTHY, DOESN’T MEAN THAT IT IS. EDUCATION ABOUT THIS IS SO IMPORTANT.

The right supplements CAN make your life super easy. So how do you know if the protein you have chosen protein is safe? Make sure your protein is made from organic plant protein, which is highly alkaline (not acidic). As an advocate for alkaline eating and health, my experience has lead me to Amazonia’s RAW Protein as it is all natural vegan, plant-based superfood and an excellent quality, protein source. No chemicals and nasties. I am not affiliated with Amazonia and do not get paid to endorse their products. I have just done extensive research and found their RAW protein to be the best on the market at this current time.

Please choose wisely as your choice can be the difference in nourishing your body with a health food or exposing it to a toxic, chemical, potential cancer causing concoction. Also remember: you get what you pay for, so when it comes to your health, always choose high quality.

What Protein Are You using At The Moment? What Are Your Thoughts? Let me Know in the Comments Below…

In health and happiness,

emily drew
 

 
References:

1. Fiocchi, A (2010) World Allergy Organization (WAO) Diagnosis and Rationale for Action against Cow’s Milk Allergy (DRACMA) Guidelines. World Allergy Organ J [Online] v.3(4); Apr. Available at: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3488907/

2. Susan S. Schiffman1, Kristina I. Rother (2013) Sucralose, A Synthetic Organochlorine Sweetener: Overview Of Biological Issues. J Toxicol Environ Health B Crit Rev. [Online] Sep; 16(7): 399-451. Available at: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/10937404.2013.842523#.VIUIbWSUd_c

3. Food and Drug Administration (2003) Federal Register: December 31 (Volume 68, Number 250) Available at: http://www.fda.gov/OHRMS/DOCKETS/98fr/03-32101.htm

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